Sunday, February 23, 2020

MOP Video: Outlander "Between Two Fires" Episode 502 RECAP




Outlander “Between Two Fires” Season 5 Episode 502 RECAP! 

My Outlander Purgatory's Carol and Tracey are back to recap the second episode of Season 5 of Outlander, the Starz series based on Diana Gabaldon's best selling book series. Join us as we break down every moment, including flipping the script on sad anniversaries; a whole new insight into Murtaugh Fitzgibbons; how eating carbs is the one benefit of living in the 18th century; why Claire’s surgery is better than Urgent Care; the “fake body in the casket we REALLY wanted to see”; an ode to Jamie’s amazing diplomatic season 5 wig; how the Tufty McFluffytail club is the best club ever; getting even more intense with our weekly worship of Lauren Lyle as Marsali FLIPS OUT ALL OVER THE DAMN SURGERY; how Jamie is surrounded by idiots; the supposed conflict of Murtaugh; Claire’s mad bread baking skillz; how Bree is a little confused by what walking is; how we don’t like to be reminded of the crazy of Stephen Bonnet; and MUCH MUCH MORE!!

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13 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. This episode is difficult to watch. .I prioritized the events of this episode. Do you agree?

    TAR AND FEATHERING. Lover boy last week, judge, juror and executioner this week. Knowing the brutality Jamie suffered at the hands of Black Jack Randal and the evidence of the scarring on Jamie’s back, it’s hard to believe that Murtagh would order the tar and feathering of anyone. The Murtagh I know would beat the shit out of you in a fair fight. The only thing close was revenge on the person who raped Mary. Laying the head at her feet. What does the future hold Murtagh?

    IMPULSE SLAUGHTERING. Lt. Knotts is shocked when he impulsively stabs the regulator to death. He is remorseful. Jamie manipulates this to his advantage.

    THE DUEL. Let’s make a deal with Bianna’s rejected suitor. Bonnet is pure evil. He won, he deformed but he stopped short of killing because he’s a father. Watch out!

    FRANKENSTEIN OR MRS. HYDE? Claire makes bread and conducts autopsies. She’s making the penicillin potion. She also lectures the candle making women on medical matters.

    THE APPRENTICE. Excellent opportunity to feature Marsali. Now poor Fergus needs a good story line.

    TURKEY SHOOT. Brianna the sharp shooter tutors Roger the captain. Roger can’t get a break. Now he has a vision problem to compound his shooting ability. He still can sing (to me any day). By finding the sketches he knows Brianna is haunted by Bonnet. It also brings up the question of Jem’s parentage.

    BULLFROG WALKS. Time moves on. Jem is starting to walk. Can he hear the stones? Richard nailed the emotion of this scene.

    MISSING SCENE. Jamie needs a scene with Claire so he can verbally express his feeling about Murtagh. Sam is such a good actor that you can see a lot in his face and eyes. The transformation of Murtagh is unsettling. It’s difficult for me to process.

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    1. Impulse slaughtering- Knotts is remorseful- Bonnet is not... Murtagh is not. Three different motivations. Only one is sociopathic. Murtgah reminds me of the kind of transformation that terrorists undergo as they come to de-humanize the people they consider to be their enemies.

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  3. What a great episode and recap! You nailed it. Murtagh tarring and feathering in Hillsborough??!!! Jamie trying to fulfill obligation and retain his honor? OMG! Marsali (what a great find she has been), her reaction to Claire was brilliant and funny. Stephen Bonnet. When that scene began, I knew what was coming and didn't watch it. My son told me when it was safe to turn around. Horrifying. Words in a book look much different in color. All around, another brilliant episode. Can't hardly wait for 503.

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  4. Googled Fluffy McFluffytail. He is real. https://db0nus869y26v.cloudfront.net/en/Green_Cross_Code

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  5. Glad you’re talking about Tom. I’m still talking about Rick, my hubby, after 6 years. Especially now that we have a granddaughter. They may not be preset but they are still around. Always wondered how Diana is going to handle “Jamie’s ghost”?? He is dead coming back to the beginning to reminisce?? He wouldn’t be bound by time then. I guess we will have to wait until book 10! And book 9 isn’t out yet!!!

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  6. Talking about Jamie being between things- reminds me of the position Collum had to take before Culloden... trying to run the middle way because of his responsibility to his people. Collum always believed Jamie to be the best choice for Laird- and now, Jamie is Laird in the savvy tradition of Collum. It's really interesting.

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    1. And about the opening theme music- it dawned on me at this episode that the 'boys choir' version is the English version of the Scots song... and at the very end, we have the haunting echo of the original woman's voice singing. The message in the music is Jamie donning the jacket of the redcoats.... the Skye boat song being sung by an English boys choir... get it? It's not really about how much we like it, right?

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  7. Gals- you ask the question- what differentiates Murtagh from Bonnet? Their actions- are they more similar than different? I would like to comment on that. Murtagh and Bonnet are totally different from one another- Murtagh has a cause- a reason and a history behind his terrorism (that is what it is after all). His whole life has been defined by his country being occupied by the British, his culture being appropriated and suppressed, he has been imprisoned, deported, he has been indentured etc etc. you get it. Bonnet, on the other hand is a complete sociopath. He is void of empathy and conscience- he doesn't care about the consequences to others from his actions. So, I see the two men as being very different- and we see in this juxtaposition of their actions how intention and motivation places context around action. Does it make them any more or less culpable for their actions? I think that they are equally culpable- War crimes are not excusable just as sociopathic assault and criminal insanity is not excusable in a civil society. I think of serial killers like Ted Bundy- he is an iteration Steven Bonnet. They kill for no reason in particular and have no remorse. When you are tempted to think of Bonnet as hot- think of all the poor women who thought Ted Bundy was hot... and where they are now. It's the same thing.

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  8. Love your posts! I search for them each week after the airing and only stumbled upon them last season. You two are wonderful and I am so sorry for the loss of Tom. I always loved when you mentioned his wise-cracking thoughts after each episode lat year. I lost my mum in December and she was very pragmatic and wouldn't want a lot of fuss over her passing - much like Tom. So glad you mentioned his anniversary as I knew something happened but you didn't mention much in the first podcast for season 5. My best to you and your family,

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  9. Initially thought Murtagh was being cast as a Duncan Innes sub, but that was shot out of the water last week, then maybe taking an amped up version of the Hermon Husband role as leader of the regulators, but then later in episode Husband was introduced, so no. Now it seems Murtagh's being cast as just a hot-head that will be killed off at some point for more drama. (Hope I'm wrong.) The writers are not yet presenting the tribulations of the regulators in an empathetic manner. The colonists, especially the back-country settlers' economy and commerce was still primarily a barter system. There was little access to the King's silver that was required to pay taxes, which unlike the Lairds rent was the only acceptable currency. It seems that taxes (considered unreasonably high to build a palace for the governor, etc.) were assessed and then "collected" after the cash crops were sown and ready for harvesting, a year's effort for a farmer, taken by the new owner - typically a crony of the sherrif, who got the property for the back taxes due. Complaints and pleas to the "Justices" were not heard. Taxation without representation... Not justification for the violence perpetrated on them, but the tipping point on tempers has been reached.
    Enjoy your reviews.

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    1. Thank you for your historical insights. Well appreciated!

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  10. I heard Bear McCreary used a Choral rendition of the Skye Song because it was popular during that era. Yes, not my favorite but I like how he adapts the song for each season.

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